“What Hitchcock’s Vertigo teaches us about love” by Noël Carroll in the Agora series edited by KCL’s @aj_wendland in The New Statesman

Check out the latest from the Agora, “What Hitchcock’s Vertigo teaches us about love” by Noël Carroll, Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the CUNY Graduate Center!

The film’s twin love stories contrast two ways of understanding what tethers us to someone: personal qualities and shared history – Noël Carroll. (LANDMARK MEDIA / Alamy)

See this new article by Noël Carroll in @aj_wendland‘s Agora series @NewStatesmanNoël Carroll is also the and author of Philosophy and the Moving Image and Arthur Danto’s Philosophy of Art.

@aj_wendland launched and runs the philosophy column in The New Statesman called Agora, which is a space for academics to address contemporary social, political and cultural issues from a philosophical point of view.

“Why democracies need the notion of a loyal opposition” by Jo Wolff in the Agora series edited by KCL’s @aj_wendland in The New Statesman

 by Jo Wolff (@JoWolffBSG), the Alfred Landecker professor of values and public policy at the Blavatnik School of Government, and governing body fellow at Wolfson College, Oxford!

Democracy is a battle of ideas, but one that depends on treating opponents as legitimate adversaries not treasonous enemies. – Jo Wolff (Oxford)

See this new article by @JoWolffBSG on storytelling in the social sciences in @aj_wendland‘s Agora series @NewStatesman. Jonathan Wolff is also the author of “Ethics and Public Policy: A Philosophical Inquiry” (Routledge).

@aj_wendland launched and runs the philosophy column in The New Statesman called Agora, which is a space for academics to address contemporary social, political and cultural issues from a philosophical point of view.

Wishing everyone a safe and restful holiday season! – King’s Department of Philosophy (@kingsphilosophy)

“Why social science needs stories” by Al Prescott-Couch in the Agora series edited by KCL’s @aj_wendland in The New Statesman

Check out the latest from the Agora, “Why social science needs stories” by Alexander Prescott-Couch (@prescottcouch), who is Associate Professor of Philosophy and Tutorial Fellow at Lincoln College, Oxford.

Statistics can illuminate the world, but narratives explain why the numbers matter – Alex Prescott-Couch (Oxford).

See this new article by @prescottcouch on storytelling in the social sciences in @aj_wendland‘s Agora series @NewStatesman. @aj_wendland launched and runs the philosophy column in The New Statesman called Agora, which is a space for academics to address contemporary social, political and cultural issues from a philosophical point of view.

Three new 15-min Masterclasses from the Royal Institute of Philosophy (@RIPhilo) – including a Masterclass by our very own Prof. Bill Brewer (@mbillbrewer), “Do We Perceive the Physical World Directly?”!

In a new 15 minute Masterclass Youtube video, Professor Bill Brewer (@mbillbrewer), Susan Stebbing Professor of Philosophy at King’s College London, asks whether we perceive the physical world directly: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRmDqOOYs2k

Also new and exciting are two other 15 minute Masterclasses by Professor Robert Stern, Professor of Philosophy at the University of Sheffield, “What are Kant’s formulations of the supreme principle of morality?” and “How does Kant identify the supreme principle of morality?

The Royal Institute of Philosophy’s (@RIPhilo) 15-Minute Masterclass series brings you accessible overviews of 30 philosophical topics from eminent philosophers. You can watch them all here on the Royal Institute of Philosophy’s Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqK-cZS_wviDkzVDUAw-AeZHrmt5mq8wB

“Much Ado About Nothing: Heidegger, Carnap, and the Continental-Analytic Split” is airing @cbcideas this week, and it features KCL’s Sacha Golob and @aj_wendland!

You can listen to the podcast for Ideas on CBC Radio here!: https://www.cbc.ca/radio/ideas/how-a-debate-over-nothing-split-western-philosophy-apart-1.6268281

‘Why are there beings at all instead of nothing? That is the question,’ said philosopher Martin Heidegger.

In 1929, German philosopher Martin Heidegger gave a lecture at the University of Freiburg. He spoke at length — poetically and densely — about nothing. Many were enthralled by his talk, but scientist-philosopher Rudolf Carnap thought his talk of nothing, added up to… nothing. (Shutterstock / Jared Romanowicz)

“Charles Mills: Reimagining Political Philosophy” by Sophie Smith in the Agora series edited by KCL’s @aj_wendland in The New Statesman

Check out the latest from the Agora, “Charles Mills: Reimagining Political Philosophy”, by Sophie Smith, Associate Professor of Political Theory at the University of Oxford.

Charles Mills, who died earlier this year, was a model for a political philosophy engaged with subjects the discipline had systematically ignored, first among them race and racism.

You can also read Sophie’s (@DrSophieSmith) most recent article, “Historicising Rawls”, which elaborates on Charles Mills’s contributions to the history of 20th-century political philosophy.

KCL is pleased to announce that Vision Fellow in Public Philosophy, @aj_wendland , has been appointed to the inaugural class of Media Fellows at the Marc Sanders Foundation! You can read more about the fellowship and Dr. Wendland’s public work below at kingsphilosophy.com: 

Dr. Aaron James Wendland (@aj_wendland), new Media Fellow at the Marc Sanders Foundation and Vision Fellow in Public Philosophy at King’s College London

King’s College London is pleased to announce that Vision Fellow in Public Philosophy, Dr. Aaron James Wendland, has been appointed to the inaugural class of Media Fellows at the Marc Sanders Foundation. The Marc Sanders Foundation is committed to using philosophy to help the world approach larger personal and social issues with the thoughtfulness, care, and rigor needed to drive understanding and change, and their Media Fellowships are designed to increase the presence of philosophically inspired discourse in the public sphere. As a Media Fellow at the Marc Sanders Foundation, Dr. Wendland will sharpen his podcasting skills and build on his current public work for The New Statesman, The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, and The Centre for Philosophy and Art.

“The Political Risks of Big Data Dominance” by F. Debrabander in the Agora series edited by KCL’s @aj_wendland in The New Statesman

Check out the latest from the Agora, “The Political Risks of Big Data Dominance” by Firmin DeBrabander who is Professor of Philosophy at the Maryland Institute College of Art!

“Big Data’s hubristic claim that it understands humanity opens the door to dangerous forms of manipulation and control” –@Firdebrabander on Rationalism, Politics, and Big Data in @aj_wendland‘s Agora series @NewStatesman

“What is romantic friendship?” by Sukaina Hirji & Meena Krishnamurthy in the Agora series edited by KCL’s @aj_wendland in The New Statesman

Check out the latest from the Agora, “What is romantic friendship?” by Sukaina Hirji, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania, and Meena Krishnamurthy, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Queen’s University: https://www.newstatesman.com/ideas/agora/2021/11/what-is-romantic-friendship

“Deep and lasting connections come in many forms. As we push the boundary beyond traditional romance, we need a new language to talk about love” –@hirjisukaina and @mkrishnamurthyX on Murdoch, Foot, and romantic friendship in @aj_wendland‘s Agora series @NewStatesman

“A virtuous circle: Academic expertise and public philosophy” New article by @aj_wendland now available in Human Affairs!

You can read the article here!: https://t.co/gJcMe4FORm?amp=1

Dr. Aaron Wendland, KCL Vision Fellow in Public Philosophy

Abstract: “A virtuous circle: Academic expertise and public philosophy”

This essay examines the relationship between academic and public philosophy through the lens of Heidegger studies. Specifically, this essay: shows how Heidegger uses technical terminology within the context of the academy to break new philosophical ground; explains how suitably clarified technical terminology can be used to introduce people to Heidegger’s philosophy and to apply Heidegger’s ideas to current affairs; and illustrates how the application of Heidegger’s ideas to contemporary issues results in new forms of academic research. Ultimately, this essay argues that there is a dialectical relationship between academic and public philosophy: i.e., public philosophy translates esoteric ideas developed in the academy into publicly accessible prose and then applies those ideas to daily life; but in doing so, public philosophy inspires new lines of academic inquiry.